RIPL Community of Practice

Full Version: Evaluation Projects
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For my project I’d like to come up with a good way to poll our users about programs. The public services staff do a great job of coming up with and publicizing neat programs, but attendance varies. So I’d like to come up with a survey or other tool to see either if there are particular programs our customers want that we aren’t delivering, if there’s better timing for programs, or to find out the reasons why people aren’t coming in for programs. I figure if we get a better handle on our competition we might be able to use that info too.
 
However, I read another post about finding ways to use data to better drive acquisitions. As acquisitions is more my wheelhouse than programs, I might steal that idea instead.
We recently re-opened in our newly renovated facility and invested in a lot of new technology including: a green screen filming room, Smartboards, video conferencing equipment, a presentation room with a Smart Lectern, and more. I would like to evaluate the use of our technology by small business owners, entrepreneurs, etc. and look at the need for additional technology in the future. More specifically how does our “wired” meeting space contribute to local economic development. What community business needs are we meeting and does that segment of the population know what we have to offer?
I have been tossing a couple ideas around for my evaluation project.  I believe the one I am going to focus on is evaluating the pieces needed and the process to establish a tech tutoring program using volunteers.  We have a strong volunteer program, but we do not utilize them to help with basic computer questions because there are many pieces to that, legally as well as others, that I have been needing to look at.

The other one that I was debating using was program evaluation for effectiveness of programs versus the cost of them.  Is there a way to better manage the cost versus success of our programs, and how to track all of that in a better way.
My library is in a suburb of a large metropolitan area where 45.8% of the population is Hispanic, most of whom do not speak English. About 70% of those that come to the library are Hispanic, usually mothers checking out books for their children. We offer ESL classes which are well attended, but we have had poor attendance at other events.

For my project, I want to evaluate services to Hispanics in the community with the end goal of providing data to show the need to hire a part time program coordinator specifically for Hispanic services. Half of our staff is Hispanic, but they do not have the experience to plan and implement Spanish programs. This is also something that the library board wants to include in our long-range plan for the library.
We are beginning a National Endowment for the Arts project, Easy as ABC: Arts Bridging Community.
The project will consist of community picnics where all members of the community are invited to help install public art pieces in public parks and some privately-owned, historically significant locations. As community members of all ages gather to create the art together, we will also facilitate discussions and gather input on community issues, solutions, etc.
We can easily measure the outputs in the form of number of participants, number of art pieces installed, etc. to satisfy the NEA requirements, but I would also like to measure outcomes: How has this project changed the community? How has this project changed your view of the community? Has this project impacted your perspective of your neighbors?
I want to gain information on how to convince my Commissioner's that we need additional staff. In 1973 we had three full time employees. We were in a 2,000 square foot building, circulated 10,000 items and did not have any computers.  Now we are in a 10,000 square foot building, circulate 40,000 items and have 22 computers to keep up with and help with. We still have three employees. I've asked every year and shown data and begged and pleaded but it falls on deaf ears. I desperately want to have a better way of assessing and showing this need.
My library is supposed to start renovating and expanding in the next fiscal year, and while we've already identified needs for the building, it's a good opportunity to look at programming needs for the community that we will be able to implement once our meeting/programming space is expanded. What do people want? How can the library be more relevant and interesting to this particular population? What types of programs would our community prioritize attending?
My library desperately needs more room in order to deliver the same quality of services that our citizens have come to love and expect.  We will be in competition with a new police headquarters and a new fire station for spots on the bond ballot.   I want to develop a compelling annual report that I can update each year between now and the election in May 2019 to help convince voters of the value of their library.
With an expansion starting in a couple of months, I would like to have all of the data in line when approaching the county commissioners and judge for additional employees. They are aware more employees are needed. I just want to make sure they are added in a timely fashion.
Another topic would be polling the community about the programs and services that the library provides.
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